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Guide to Getting Recruited by College Coaches

College Coaches


High School Player Profiles and Video - Click Here

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Lacrosse Recruiting Advice & Information

Please click here to visit Athletic Scholarships website

What are the athletic requirements to receive a lacrosse scholarship?
These are the general guidelines for what coaches look for in a lacrosse player. You can still get a scholarship if you don’t meet these requirements but it will be more difficult.

Men’s Lacrosse

NCAA 1:

  • All-American
  • All-State
  • All-League/District
  • Extensive club/travel team experience
  • Attends camps and showcases
  • 4 year high school varsity starter
  • Team MVP

NCAA 2:

  • All-State
  • All-League/District
  • 3 year high school varsity starter
  • Club/travel team experience
  • Attends camps and showcases
  • Team MVP

NCAA D3:

  • All-League/District
  • 2 year varsity starter
  • Club/travel team experience
  • Attends camps and showcases

Women’s Lacrosse

NCAA 1:

  • All-American
  • All-State
  • All-League/District
  • Extensive club/travel team experience
  • Attends camps and showcases
  • 4 year high school varsity starter
  • Team MVP

NCAA 2:

  • All-State
  • All-League/District
  • 3 year high school varsity starter
  • Club/travel team experience
  • Attends camps and showcases
  • Team MVP

NCAA D3:

  • All-League/District
  • 2 year varsity starter
  • Club/travel team experience
  • Attends camps and showcases
 
  How many lacrosse scholarships are available and what schools offer them? Number of scholarships offered per team, per year, by Division:

Not all colleges that are eligible to offer scholarships will choose to do so. For example, Ivy League schools choose not to offer athletic scholarships.

Lacrosse is an equivalency sport which means all scholarships are NOT full scholarships, and coaches can divide the value of the scholarships available to them between as many players as they see fit. Full rides are very rare.

Men’s Lacrosse
NCAA D1: 12.6
NCAA D2: 10.8
NJCAA: 20

Women’s Lacrosse
NCAA D1: 12
NCAA D2: 9.9
NJCAA: 20

Number of College Lacrosse Programs

Men’s Lacrosse
NCAA D1: 59
NCAA D2: 38
*NCAA D3: 156
NJCAA: 27
Total: 290

Women’s Lacrosse
NCAA D1: 87
NCAA D2: 47
*NCAA D3: 177
NJCAA: 16
Total: 335

*NCAA Division 3 schools do not offer athletic scholarships, but do offer other forms of financial aid.

 

Who are the top college lacrosse programs in each division?
These are some of the top lacrosse programs in the country. Start your research by looking over their roster and seeing what level their athletes played before college. Knowing where coaches typically recruit can help you if you want to play for them.

Men’s Lacrosse

NCAA D1: Virginia, North Carolina, Duke, Maryland, Syracuse, Cornell, Princeton, Stony Brook, Georgetown, Notre Dame, John Hopkins, Loyola Maryland, Army, Denver, Hofstra, Harvard, UMBC

NCAA D2: CW Post, Dowling, Le Moyne, Mercyhurst, Limestone, Merrimack, NYIT, St. Leo, Bentley, Queens (N.C.), Adelphi

NCAA D3: Stevenson, Salisbury, Cortland State, Gettysburg, Roanoke, Tufts, Dickinson, Cabrini, Lynchburg, Haverford, RPI, Middlebury, RIT, Stevens

Women’s Lacrosse

NCAA D1: Maryland, Northwestern, North Carolina, Duke, Virginia, Georgetown, Penn, James Madison, Syracuse, Vanderbilt, Notre Dame, Towson, Stanford, Dartmouth, Penn State, Loyola Maryland, Hofstra, Florida, Stoney Brook

NCAA D2: CW Post, Lock Haven, Adelphi, Limestone, West Chester, Stonehill, Mercyhurst, Gannon, Merrimack, Molloy, Rollins, Queens

NCAA D3: Hamilton, Salisbury, Franklin and Marshall, Gettysburg, Cortland State, TCNJ, Stevens, Trinity, Colby, Williams, Amherst, Babson, Union, Washington & Lee, Tufts, Middlebury


College & Beyond

Great info from Blue Chip 225


NCAA Website

NCAA website for lacrosse



NCAA Recruiting Definitions

Click here for up to date definitions and vocabulary of the NCAA



NCAA Division I - Recruiting Calendar

Quiet Period?? Dead Period?? Contact Period?? Contact Period with Evaluation?? Know your dates.



Sample Introduction Letter

Help get you started sending out those Introduction Letters to College Coaches



Sample Bio Letter

Tell them what you have done...what you are doing



Army Lacrosse


National Governing Body

College Selection Guide, Insurance, Membership



Video - Creating Your DVD

College coaches stress the importance of video in the evaluation process.


Information on College Recruiting


LaxPower Lacrosse Links

The standard college guides are sources of information and should be consulted for information on admissions, curriculum, costs, student activities, but for information about the lacrosse program you need to find your way to the section of the college or university web site that relates to the lacrosse program.  Click anywhere in the white area below to go to this resource on the Laxpower.com web site. What can you learn:
What division do they compete in?
What is the contact information for the coaching staff?
Who on the staff is responsible for recruiting?
What is the team record in the past year?
How do I fill out the Prospective Student Questionnaire?
How do I fit in with the height and weight of current players?
Are players from one area ? Are there players from a broad area?
Are there many players from my area?
How do I contact current players to ask about the team?
What is the background of the current head coach?
Can I watch games on the web or TV from this team?


NCAA Lacrosse Recruiting 101


Step 1:
(Prior to and during High School) participate in athletic events outside of your local area and attend high-profile clinics in the sport of your choice. College coaches often attend these activities to evaluate talent. Freshman Year.....

Step 2: (Entering your Freshman Year) Get together with your High School counselor and design a college prep program to fit your needs. Picking the right core classes is important. Form a good relationship with your student counselor. They will put you on the right track and later in your high school career they will become very important during your local scholarship searches. IMPORTANT!!! You must put academics high on your priority list. You may be a great athlete but you will never be looked at or even considered if you do not have a good G.P.A. Maintain your grades, work hard on and off the field and the rewards will be great. Slacking off will only make things harder in the end. I have seen many great athletes fail to go to the next level simply because they did not pay attention in the classroom. Join as many clubs as you can fit into your schedule; top College's look at the overall you. They want well diverse people, the more sports you participate in, the better. Sophomore Year.....

Step 3: (Sophomore year) Begin to think about and evaluate the colleges of your choice. Make a check list of Pros & Cons without considering lacrosse. What type of school will make you happy? Big vs Small Campus not just physical size but total enrollment/population. How far from home will you go? Major/Career Interest? Cold vs Warm Climate? Once you have those answers look at schools that fit your choices and offer lacrosse. Begin taping your games and start your Video Library. Game footage - not yet a highlight film. The importance is to not make yourself look like the perfect athlete. All of us make mistakes sometimes - it is how you respond to those mistakes that is important. Coaches just want to see how you move and how athletic you are. Search for Videographers in your area. Your school may have a TV Production program or teacher/student that films other sports. Get to one recruiting Camp/Tournament in the Summer or Fall.

Step 4: (Junior year) The recruiting process begins. Due to budgeting issues more often then not, it is difficult for coaches to spend significant amounts of money to go out and recruit prospective student athletes. The exceptions are high revenue sports such as football and basketball. Knowing this, you become the initiator. Contact the college coaches of your choice. Show that you have interest in their programs. Formulate a letter of introduction (SEE BELOW). Send it along with a Bio letter (SEE BELOW) of your athletic/educational accomplishments and any press clippings. They will respond with some form of a reply. The process has now begun. Be it a bit early it is important to maintain contact with the coach. You need to show the coach and the College that you are interested in their school. Ask about setting up an "unofficial visit."  Continue correspondence with coaches with monthly updates on your accomplishments, press clippings, video, etc.  Video - Creating a highlight video of yourself is very vital to getting yourself seen. Create a professional looking video to show your strengths and skills. The video should try to be short (NO more than 15 minutes) and to the point. Coaches have very little time to watch every single hit you had and every catch you made.

Step 5: Academically: SAT's and ACT's should be taken at the beginning of your junior year. Take them often! The highest score in each category is the actual score when submitting for acceptance into a College.

Step 6: CAMPS/ALL-STAR TOURNAMENTS: If possible, try to attend as many instructional camps as possible. Ask your High School coach if he/she knows of any camps in your area. Also, some colleges even host their own Summer Camps. If a College you are interested in is hosting one, be sure to attend so that the coach can see you in action. Tryout for All-star tournaments held in "traditional hot-beds" where many college coaches can see you play.

SENIOR YEAR.....

Step 7: (Senior year). The recruiting process gets into high gear with those colleges interested in you and you in them. Time to take a visit. Visits can range from visiting the school at your own expense or the College taking care of all expenses. Athletes are allowed 5 fully paid visits. Visits determine if the fit is right for you and for the College.

Step 8: Athletic Assistance can be from getting you admitted to the College to a full athletic scholarship. We encourage you to do your homework on all the financial opportunities available to you. Explore with your high school counseling office the applications for financial assistance given out by local organizations, state and federal financial grants (grants are not loans, and do not need to be paid back). Coaches can also draw information from your resume and financial aid applications to draw money from their College to assist you with your financial needs.

Step 9: There are almost NO "full-scholarships" for lacrosse. Combining the above resources and athletic money, your College educational costs will be reduced.

Step 10: With the visits completed; your college chosen; financial decisions complete. The College recruiting process is complete.

Enjoy the next 4 years!